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Bead Netting
Samples Part III
Van Dyke

Beadwork February/March 2002
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The name Van Dyke originated from a beard, Sir Anthony Vandyke’s beard, (1599-1641), which was short and pointed.  From beards to beadwork, the basic shape was recreated in netting, both all fiber and with beads.  Sir Anthony began a fashion fad which resulted in Van Dyke bead netting becoming most popular during the Victorian era for jewelry and as embellishment of bags and clothing.  Jet and pearl beads were worked into Van Dyke designs prior to the development of small beads.  Today, we revitalize old techniques using new materials and variations on a design.  The double and quadruple Van Dyke samples are new ideas for samples in addition to the Single Van Dyke of the past.

Bead Netting - Van Dyke
This stitch is also known as Shoshone Web and Bead Netted Lace

Materials
Czech seed beads or Delicas in 3 colors, identified as C1, C2, C3.  A number in front of the color indicates how many beads of that color to string:  3C2 means three color two beads
Size “A” Silamide thread, #944 Ash Gray or #533 Lt. Brown

Notions
Size 12 sharps or beading needles
Scissors

VanDyke1c-250.jpg (5677 bytes)

Van Dyke Single - Czech Version

VanDyke1d-250.jpg (4973 bytes)

Van Dyke Single - Delica Version

For This Sampler
Use about 40” of single working thread and leave a 5” tail to stitch back into the sample.  Three bead colors are used in this sample.  When running out of thread, leave enough thread to stitch back in, thread a second needle, take the needle through a few stitches next to where the first needle sets and make the next few stitches.  Stitch in the old thread and cut off the excess thread.  Stitch in the tail end of the new thread also.  For the Van Dyke, make a knot in the first bead set for stability while working.  When the sample is finished, stitch more thread through the samplers for strength along the thread path of the bead netting.  C3 is the color for the foundation row; C1 is the primary color used in the netting and C2 is the point bead for each “V” shape of netting in each row.

Note:  This sample is a little more dificult for left-handers to work following right-hand illustrations.  Below are complete illustrations for both right-hand and left-hand to help you out.     lep and isntru right-hand wIf you are a left-hander, your needle will come out from the opposite direction the illustration depicts for the last diamond in the foundation.  Right-handers work the diamond shape with the needle going through the four beads towards the right, ending with the needle going to the right with the last diamond (17th).  Left-handers work the diamond shape with the needle going through the four beads towards the left, ending with the needle going to the left with the last diamond.(17th).

How to Make this Stitch

Diamond Shape Foundation  “4 bead start” 
Use color 1 beads to make the diamond foundation.  String 4C1 beads and make a knot..  Take the needle through 2 beads of those just strung, forming a diamond shape. 
VDStart-right-50.jpg (4212 bytes)
figure 1 - left handed
VDStart-left-50.jpg (4245 bytes)
figure 1 - right handed

 

Foundation Row - Left Handed
String 3 beads, pass the needle through the bead the thread is coming from and the next 2 beads to reach the end and continue the diamond shape.  Continue with the 3 bead diamond formations for a total of 17 diamonds; this is the foundation row.  (fig. 2a)  Take the needle through the first bead sticking out along the side of the foundation row.  Lefties work from the right side towards the left .
VanDykeBase-left-25.jpg (4891 bytes)
figure 2 - left handed

 

Foundation Row - Right Handed
String 3 beads, pass the needle through the bead the thread is coming from and the next 2 beads to reach the end and continue the diamond shape.  Continue with the 3 bead diamond formations for a total of 17 diamonds; this is the foundation row.  (fig. 2b)  Take the needle through the first bead sticking out along the side of the foundation row.  Righties work from the left side towards the right.
VanDykeBase-right-25.jpg (4899 bytes)
figure 2 - right handed

Now you are ready to begin the Van Dyke netting from this foundation, horizontally back and forth,
decreasing by one bead color combo in each row, forming a “V” shape. 
Look at the foundation illustration (fig 2) before beginning row 1 of the Van Dyke netting.


Van Dyke Single - Left Handed
Row 1
 Each row is worked in 5 color combos:  3C1, 1C2, 3C1.  String this 5 bead color combo, then skip the 1st bead sticking out from the foundation row and pass the needle through the next.  Repeat this step across the foundation row.  At the end of the 1st row of netting, work the needle back up through the 4 beads at the foundation row end, then pass the needle back down through the 3C1 and 1C2 you just strung, bringing the needle out to the point of that 5 bead color combo.  The C2 bead is the “point” bead for each bead color combo forming the netting.  You should have 8 “V” netted shapes for row 1.  Refer to fig.2.

 Row 2  Now you are ready to work the 2nd row of netting.  String the same bead color combo and pass the needle across through the next point bead of the previous row.  Repeat this process across, adding a total of 7 bead color combos that form row 2 of the netting.  For the last “V” of row 2, take the needle up through 1C2 (point bead) of row 1 and the 4 foundation beads at the end, then bring the needle down through the 3C1 and 1C2 point bead to begin row 3.  There should be 7 netted “V” sections for row 2.  The thread should not show on the foundation bottom bead sticking out.

 Rows 3 through 8  Continue to decrease by one “V” of beads in each row until there is only one “V” for the 8th row.  The needle is worked up through the previous row of netting, then back down to begin the next row.  Each time the needle is worked through a previous row of netting, zigzag through the netting, skipping the each side and bottom C2 point beads of the previous netting row.  This way the thread will not show outside the beads.  Look at the illustration with bead netting attached to the foundation row.(fig 3)  See figs. 4 a for close up view of thread path.  The Single Van Dyke was the standard shape for Victorian Van Dyke bead netting.  Notice how the Single Van Dyke draws up and the foundation is not straight.  This works perfect for larger netted necklaces which allow for a curve at the top working towards the neckline.

VPattern-left.jpg (25196 bytes)

 

Van Dyke Single - Right Handed
Row 1
 Each row is worked in 5 color combos:  3C1, 1C2, 3C1.  String this 5 bead color combo, then skip the 1st bead sticking out from the foundation row and pass the needle through the next.  Repeat this step across the foundation row.  At the end of the 1st row of netting, work the needle back up through the 4 beads at the foundation row end, then pass the needle back down through the 3C1 and 1C2 you just strung, bringing the needle out to the point of that 5 bead color combo.  The C2 bead is the “point” bead for each bead color combo forming the netting.  You should have 8 “V” netted shapes for row 1.  Refer to fig.2.

 Row 2  Now you are ready to work the 2nd row of netting.  String the same bead color combo and pass the needle across through the next point bead of the previous row.  Repeat this process across, adding a total of 7 bead color combos that form row 2 of the netting.  For the last “V” of row 2, take the needle up through 1C2 (point bead) of row 1 and the 4 foundation beads at the end, then bring the needle down through the 3C1 and 1C2 point bead to begin row 3.  There should be 7 netted “V” sections for row 2.  The thread should not show on the foundation bottom bead sticking out.

 Rows 3 through 8  Continue to decrease by one “V” of beads in each row until there is only one “V” for the 8th row.  The needle is worked up through the previous row of netting, then back down to begin the next row.  Each time the needle is worked through a previous row of netting, zigzag through the netting, skipping the each side and bottom C2 point beads of the previous netting row.  This way the thread will not show outside the beads.  Look at the illustration with bead netting attached to the foundation row.(fig 3)  See figs. 4 a for close up view of thread path.  The Single Van Dyke was the standard shape for Victorian Van Dyke bead netting.  Notice how the Single Van Dyke draws up and the foundation is not straight.  This works perfect for larger netted necklaces which allow for a curve at the top working towards the neckline.

VPattern-right.jpg (24880 bytes)

Van Dyke Double
Make another Single Van Dyke and then work the opposite side of the diamond foundation in the beads sticking out, those not used for the Single Van Dyke.  The colors for this side will be different.  String 2C2, 1C1, 2C2 for each “V”.  Stitch through the first 4 beads of the diamond foundation and bring the needle out through the next, string 2C2, 1C1, 2C2 and continue across.  There will be 7 rows to begin and decrease down to one.  This side will be smaller than the original and will have colors switched for a contrast appearance.  This sample will lay flat.  If you make both sides the same number of beads to make the netting, it will not lay flat and tend to bunch up a little at both ends where the netting attaches both sides.  You can also make both sides with the 2-1-2 bead color combo on both sides and end out with a diamond flat shape.  See the samples.

VanDyke2c-250.jpg (7434 bytes)

Van Dyke Double - Czech Version

VanDyke2d-250.jpg (6311 bytes)

Van Dyke Double - Delica Version


Options   Van Dyke Quadruple Bead holes need to be large to allow the needle passage through additional times on both sides of the diamond foundation.  Make a two sided Van Dyke with 3 beads, 1 bead, 3 beads which can be set partially flat or bunched up.  Then make the next two Van Dykes with 2 beads, 1 bead, 2 beads and they will set on top the original two .  One netted group will be worked on each side through the same stitches as the original two Van Dyke pieces.  This will make a leaf type shape that can be added to beading as leaves and floral designs.  This design works well with Czech size 10/0 beads, Czech 8/0 hex beads, Delicas and size 14/0 Japanese beads because of the large bead holes.  You can also make the first set with size 8/0 Czech beads and add Czech 11/0 on top for the second set.  Note how the Delica sample lays flatter when the second set of Van Dyke Double was added on top in the smaller 2 bead-1 bead- 2 bead combo.

VanDyke2c-250.jpg (7434 bytes)

Van Dyke Double - Czech Version

VanDyke2d-250.jpg (6311 bytes)

Van Dyke Double - Delica Version

VanDyke3c-250.jpg (8859 bytes)

Van Dyke Double 3-1-3 Combo
Czech Version

VanDyke3d-250.jpg (6298 bytes)

Van Dyke Double 3-1-3 Combo
Delica Version

VanDyke4c-200.jpg (6595 bytes)

Van Dyke Double 2-1-2 Combo
Czech Version

VanDyke4d-200.jpg (5957 bytes)

Van Dyke Double 2-1-2 Combo
Delica Version

VanDyke6c-300.jpg (5833 bytes) VanDyke7d-300.jpg (7961 bytes)
Van Dyke Pendant Leaf Cluster
VanDyke5d-250.jpg (6983 bytes)

Van Dyke Quadruple


Conclusion
You can use the same bead colors for both sides; graduate the colors so the beads from one side bleeds into the other side creating great visual effects.  When working the colors from one side into the other, keep the foundation the same color as the beads in the netting instead of a separate color and the same for the point beads.   Look at the group of  double Van Dyke leaf samples that do not appear to have any exact color order.  They look like leaves.  They are made of size Czech 11/0 beads.    What can you make with the samples and techniques you ask?  Think about leaf shapes to be stitched on quilts or wearables.  Make several of the Van Dyke Doubles with the 2-1-2 formula.  You can take 3 and stitch the edges together to make a larger medallion type motif for a necklace.  You can stitch several together along their edges and make a mini quilt or stitch the diamond shapes vertically or horizontally onto a long counted cloth piece for a belt.  Use one of the motifs as the front of a bracelet and extend the same diamond foundation around the wrist and add a bracelet closure with jewelry findings.  For a making a full Van Dyke necklace, make a longer foundation before starting the netting.  Decide how long you want the “V” to be such as 15 rows or 21 rows instead of 8 like the samples.  A nice foundation length for size 11/0 or 9/0 Czech beads would be 21 diamonds, which would work out to 11 “V’s” across for the first netted row across, then 10 more rows down with a decrease of one “V” in each row down.  The formula is an odd number of diamonds for the foundation, then half that number + 1 = the number of “V’” for the first row.  If you are going to work with smaller beads, you may want to make the foundation 25 diamonds across.  I made a necklace of  9/0 3-cut beads and used the foundation as 25 diamonds.  This was too long.  The whole Van Dyke section is too long and tends to fold at the center unless you have the necklace strands on each side just perfect so the piece lays flat.  I would use 21 diamonds for my next experiment.  Work 5 beads for each color combo.  If you were to use a bigger number such as 15 beads in each “V,” it would ruffle up.  This could be a great design with ruffles fluffing all over.  You can make any kind of foundation as long as there are beads on one side to start the netting - peyote stitch would work well.  You can add a bead between each bead at the top of the diamond foundation to make a strong necklace foundation.  This can work into a peyote edging above the foundation of 3 to 5 rows for strength.  You can make the Van Dyke section and then add diamond foundation onto both sides for the necklace strap.  You can also work a larger necklace with size Czech 9/0 3-cut,  11/0 and 10/0 beads.  Silver lined and copper-lined will make sparkly necklaces with or without the bead being cut.  Square hole silver lined have bigger holes than round hole silver-lined and are very sparkly and gorgeous.  The round hole silver-lined sparkle with a softer more classic finish.  Matted and opaque earth tones will form a natural earthy necklace.

Resources For Bead Netting - Van Dyke

Instructional References

Indian Bead-Weaving Patterns by Horace Goodhue, St. Paul, MN, 1984

Creative Bead Weaving, Carol Wilcox Wells, Lark Books, Asheville, NC 1996

Beaded Obsessions III, (Cheryl Assemi/Carole Sweet/Cathy Thomsen/Connie Bell, Beadgang Publications, 2000

The Beader’s Companion, Judith Durant and Jean Campbell, Interweave Press, Loveland, CO 1998

Advanced Beadwork, Ruth F. Poris, Golden Hands Press, Tampa, FL 1989

Historical References

More Beautiful Purses, Evelyn Haertig, Gallery Graphics Press, Carmel,, CA 1990

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